Average Credit Score by Exact Age (2024)

Average Credit Score By Exact Age

Credit scores are one of the most important financial barometers. A good credit score opens doors to lower interest rates and better loan products, while a poor credit score acts as a barrier to your financial goals.

And while credit scores don’t take your age into consideration, there is a statistical association between a consumer’s age and their credit score. Read below to understand how credit scores tend to vary among different age groups and how you compare to your peers.

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The Average Credit Score Among All Ages is 714

Experian data of adults ages 23 to 99 shows that the average credit score was 714 in 2022.1 The average credit score remained unchanged from 2021.

Prior to 2018, the average credit score was below 700. Economic factors and increased awareness of how credit scores work (greatly aided by free credit score and report apps) have influenced the upward trend. But the YoY stagnation and uncertain economy may point toward a future decline.

Average Credit Scores by Age Group

Here’s how the data over a four-year period breaks down by 20-somethings, 30-somethings, and so on. The data highlights how consumers between ages 30 and 69 see the largest credit score gains over time.

Age RangeAverage FICO Credit Score 2015Average FICO Credit Score 2019Increase
745660660
30 to 39652672+20
40 to 49667683+16
50 to 59688703+15
60 to 69718733+15
70 to 79745754+9
80 to 89755757+2
90 to 99754753+1
Source: Experian

The Average FICO Score Among 20-Year-Olds Is 660

It makes sense that the youngest consumers have the lowest average credit scores. And unfortunately, credit scores of 20-somethings don’t improve as they get older — they actually decrease. 

The average 20-year-old had a 681 credit score, but a typical 29-year-old only had a 660 credit score.2 FICO defines good credit as a score of 670,3 which is the general cutoff for qualifying for many types of loans and credit cards. That means the average adult approaching 30 may not have access to the best rates and terms.

AgeAverage FICO Credit Score
20681
21670
22664
23662
24660
25659
26659
27659
28659
29660
Source: Experian

The Average FICO Score Among 30-Year-Olds is 672

By the time consumers are in their 30s, they’re working on improving their finances — and it shows. Credit scores start to increase when borrowers hit their 30s, rising from 663 for 30-year-olds to 677 for 39-year-olds.2

AgeAverage FICO Credit Score
30663
31665
32667
33670
34672
35674
36676
37676
38677
39677
Source: Experian

The Average FICO Score Among 40-Year-Olds is 683

Forty-somethings are typically hitting their stride when it comes to credit scores. By the time the average consumer is 49, they have a 689 credit score.

AgeAverage FICO Credit Score
40678
41679
42680
43680
44681
45683
46684
47685
48687
49689
Source: Experian

The Average FICO Score Among 50-Year-Olds is 703

Once consumers reach the big 5-0, their average credit scores start turning from OK to good. The average 50-year-old has a 692 credit score, but those in their mid-50s start seeing scores in the 700s.2

AgeAverage FICO Credit Score
50692
51694
52696
53698
54701
55704
56707
57711
58713
59716
Source: Experian

The Average FICO Score Among 60-Year-Olds is 733

Those in their 60s typically see a huge positive credit score swing. The average 60-year-old has a 719 credit score, but those in their late 60s have average FICO scores in the 740s. This 20-point jump represents large financial strides.2

AgeAverage FICO Credit Score
60719
61723
62726
63728
64732
65734
66736
67739
68743
69746
Source: Experian

The Average FICO Score Among 70-Year-Olds is 754

Borrowers in their 70s also tend to see credit score improvements over time. The average 70-year-old has a 747 credit score, but this jumps to 757 by the time they’re 79.

AgeAverage FICO Credit Score
70747
71750
72752
73754
74755
75755
76755
77757
78758
79757
Source: Experian

The Average FICO Score Among 80-Year-Olds is 757

Consumers in their 80s seem to hold steady, with their average credit scores never going more than one point above or below 757. 

AgeAverage FICO Credit Score
80757
81757
82758
83757
84757
85757
86757
87756
88757
89757
Source: Experian

The Average FICO Score Among 90-Year-Olds is 753

Ninety-somethings see a slight decrease in their credit scores as time goes on. The average 90-year-old has a 757 credit score, but this drops to 749 by the time they’re 99. These slight decreases are unlikely to affect their borrowing power.

AgeAverage FICO Credit Score
90757
91756
92755
93754
94753
95751
96752
97749
98749
99749
Source: Experian

Credit Scores by Generation

Credit scores tend to rise as generations get older. Here’s how the generations compare: 

Generation20212022
Generation Z (18-25)679679
Millennials (26-41)686687
Generation X (42-57)705706
Baby boomers (58-76)740742
Silent Generation (77+)760760
Source: Experian

Tips For Improving Your Credit Score

Is your credit score below the average threshold for credit scores of other people your age? Here are some ways you can fix your credit score:

  • Pay your bills on time. The largest factor that affects your credit score is your payment history — or whether you pay your bills on time. In fact, your credit score is a numerical representation of your likelihood of missing a payment by 90 days or more within the next two years4. Always making your payments before or on the due date will help you increase your credit score over time.
  • Keep credit card balances low. The next most important component is how much debt you owe, including your credit card balances. Credit card debt is measured by your credit utilization ratio (CUR), which is your current credit card balance divided by the total credit card limit. Keep your credit utilization percentage below 30% or it will negatively affect your credit scores. If your percentage is above 30%, try to pay down your credit cards. The lower your CUR, the better.
  • Avoid opening new loans. Every time you apply for a new loan or credit card, your credit score may take a hit of up to 10 points. This is due to hard credit inquiries, which occur on your credit reports whenever a lender or creditor looks at your credit reports for the purposes of reviewing a credit or loan application. Try to avoid opening any new credit cards or loans when you’re working on rebuilding your credit score unless it’s absolutely necessary.
  • Don’t close your old credit cards. The average age of your credit history makes up 15% of your credit score. When you close an old credit card, it can decrease the average age — and your credit score along with it.
  • Check your credit report. About 1 in 5 people have a mistake on their credit report that’s hurting their credit score.5 If it’s been a while since you checked your credit reports, go to www.AnnualCreditReport.com and review your credit reports. If you notice an error, file a dispute with each credit bureau. Make sure to follow up in a few weeks to see if it’s been removed.

Credit improvement takes time, but consistent efforts pay off in the long run.

Key Takeaways

Even if you’re behind compared to others in your age group, it doesn’t take years to improve your credit score. By building consistent habits, you can see your credit score jump from the bottom of the ladder to the top of the pack.

Further Reading:

Data Sources:

1 https://www.experian.com/blogs/ask-experian/what-is-the-average-credit-score-in-the-u-s/

2 https://www.experian.com/blogs/ask-experian/research/credit-scores-by-age/

3 https://www.myfico.com/credit-education/credit-scores 

4 https://www.transunion.com/docs/rev/business/financialservices/VantageScore_CreditScoreBasics-Part1.pdf 

5 https://www.consumerfinance.gov/about-us/blog/common-errors-credit-report-and-how-get-them-fixed/